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Brackish Tidal Marsh

Photos: salicicola.com

 

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Overview

Mixed herbaceous marsh that is flooded by daily tides, and occurs in brackish reach of coastal rivers. May also occur in smaller patches in upper zones of coastal salt marshes and salt ponds, usually near seepages or freshwater transition areas.

Brackish tidal marshes occur along free-flowing coastal rivers. Smaller patches often occur along the edges of salt marsh habitat, near stream inputs, seepages or other freshwater transition areas. Tidal amplitude ranges from 0 to 150 cm [comparable to freshwater tidal marshes], while average annual salinity is [0.5] - 5-18 ppt. The community is often structurally diverse, including high marsh and low marsh, with occasional occurrences along rocky shores, seepages, and ditches. Brackish Tidal Marsh, mud flat zone is rich in organic sediments and, grades into adjacent less organic Brackish Mud Flats which are classified as Estuarine Intertidal: Saline/Brackish Flats.

Photos credit to salicicola.com (unless otherwise noted). Natural communities information extracted from the Massachusetts Division of Fisheries and Wildlife Natural Heritage and Endangered Species Program (NHESP). NHESP's Brackish Tidal Marsh natural community page.

 

SEMPBA Archives: Brackish Tidal Marsh

 

Species Name

narrow-leaved cattail (Typha angustifolia)

common reed (Phragmites australis)

North American reed (Phragmites australis spp. americanus)

freshwater cord-grass (Spartina pectinata)

switchgrass (Panicum virgatum)

saltmarsh bulrush (Scirpus robustus)

seaside goldenrod (Solidago sempervirens)

rose mallow (Habiscus moscheutos)

saltmarsh sedge (Carex paleacea)

marsh bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera)

saltmarsh cord-grass (Spartina alterniflora)

threesquare (Scirpus pungens)

saltmarsh fleabane (Pluchea odorata)

water pimpernel (Samolus valerandi var. parviflorus)

mud lily (Lilaeopsis chinensis)

creeping spearwort (Ranunculus flammula var. ovalis)

 

narrow-leaved cat-tail (Typha angustifolia) (The easiest way to tell narrow-leaved cattail from broad-leaved is to look for this green gap between the staminate and pistillate parts of the spike. There is a very short one in broad-leaved cattail, so that the staminate and pistillate parts are practically close together. The color of the ripe narrow-leaved spike is much like milk chocolate, while in broad-leaved it's more like dark chocolate.)
narrow-leaved cat-tail (Typha angustifolia)
common reed (Phragmites australis)
common reed (Phragmites australis)
common reed (Phragmites australis)
North American reed (Phragmites australis spp. americanus)
North American reed (Phragmites australis spp. americanus)
North American reed (Phragmites australis spp. americanus)
North American reed (Phragmites australis spp. americanus)
freshwater cord-grass (Spartina pectinata)
freshwater cord-grass (Spartina pectinata)
freshwater cord-grass (Spartina pectinata)
freshwater cord-grass (Spartina pectinata)
switchgrass (Panicum virgatum)
switchgrass (Panicum virgatum)
switchgrass (Panicum virgatum)
switchgrass (Panicum virgatum)
saltmarsh bulrush (Scirpus robustus)
saltmarsh bulrush (Scirpus robustus)
saltmarsh bulrush (Scirpus robustus)
seaside goldenrod (Solidago sempervirens)
seaside goldenrod (Solidago sempervirens)
seaside goldenrod (Solidago sempervirens)
seaside goldenrod (Solidago sempervirens)
rose mallow (hibiscus moscheutos)
rose mallow (hibiscus moscheutos)
rose mallow (hibiscus moscheutos)
rose mallow (hibiscus moscheutos)
saltmarsh sedge (Carex paleacea)
saltmarsh sedge (Carex paleacea)
marsh bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera)
marsh bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera)
saltwater cord-grass (Spartina alterniflora)
saltwater cord-grass (Spartina alterniflora)

saltwater cord-grass (Spartina alterniflora)

threesquare (Scirpus pungens)
threesquare (Scirpus pungens)
saltmarsh fleabane (Pluchea odorata)
saltmarsh fleabane (Pluchea odorata)
saltmarsh fleabane (Pluchea odorata)
saltmarsh fleabane (Pluchea odorata)

water pimpernel (Samolus valerandi var. parviflorus)

 

Photo credit: The Aquatic World by Osete, http://elmundoacuaticobyosete.blogspot.com/2013/05/samolus-valerandi-var-parviflorus.html

water pimpernel (Samolus valerandi var. parviflorus)

Photo credit: The Aquatic World by Osete, http://elmundoacuaticobyosete.blogspot.com/2013/05/samolus-valerandi-var-parviflorus.html

water pimpernel (Samolus valerandi var. parviflorus)

Photo credit: The Aquatic World by Osete, http://elmundoacuaticobyosete.blogspot.com/2013/05/samolus-valerandi-var-parviflorus.html

mud lily (Lilaeopsis chinensis)

 

Photo credit: Steve Pennings, Georgia Coastal Ecosystems LTER Project, http://gce-lter.marsci.uga.edu/public/app/species_details.asp?id=Lilaeopsis%20chinensis

creeping spearwort (Ranunculus flammula var. ovalis)

 

Photo credit: Barry Breckling 2015,
http://www.eol.org/data_objects/32405403

creeping spearwort (Ranunculus flammula var. ovalis)

Photo credit: Eric Wrubel/NPS 2011, http://www.eol.org/data_objects/33160769